The International Game Developers Association (IGDA) recently released the results of its 2014 and 2015 annual Developer Satisfaction Survey.  Not surprisingly, like every other industry, the Video Game community is searching for ways to shorten the gap between males, females, and underrepresented ethnicities in both pay and opportunities.

According to the report, 3% of workers of color respondents were in senior management positions, while 23% of whites responded the same.  In addition, 81% of freelance workers of color earned less than $40,000 per year, while only 66% of white freelance workers earned the same.  3% of non-white freelance workers earned more than $75,000, versus 18% of whites.

Women fared much better in senior management representation (38%) versus males (37%), but not in pay.  "10% of men report earning $150,000 or more, while only three percent of women do. In contrast, 19% of women reported earning between $50,000-$75,000, whereas only 15% of men reported being in the same bracket.“  This shows that although women are represented at the senior level, their pay does not match.

The IGDA report is telling, but a good starting point for those within the industry looking to move the bar to the center.  Things such as pay gap are easily rectified as qualification is not a question (they’re already employees doing similar work).  Like tech, the video game industry is in a difficult situation.  Diversity is a hard thing to achieve for any industry not built on it, but the effort of seeking solutions is critical to change current trends.

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