Insights

Check out the most important and influential reports on supplier diversity and small business.  All descriptions have been taken from website of material creators.

Small Business Administration (US)

  • Minority Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (Sept 2016): According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 37% of the U.S. population identifies as part of at least one minority class. The populations of five states, including the two largest, California and Texas, are now over 50% minorities.  Nationwide, 29% of businesses are majority-owned by minorities, and this share is quickly increasing. During this Great Recession, a net two million minority-owned businesses were created, while a net one million non-minority-owned businesses closed. Full Report

Center for Global Policy Solutions

  • The Color of Entrepreneurship:  Why the racial gap among firms costs the US Billions (April 2016):  Businesses owned by people of color are playing an important part in restoring the health of the American economy after the Great Recession (December 2007 through June 2009). Between 2007 and 2012, privately held minority businesses contributed 1.3 million jobs to the American economy. In a more inclusive society, one where there was truly equal opportunity for all, there would be more minority-owned businesses contributing even more to America’s recovery.  Summary  Full Report

McKinsey & Company

Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs & Business Leaders

  1. Supporting and Growing Women Owned Businesses (Jan 2018):  The first of five pillar reports to be released by the Council. The recommendations of the Council aim to increase the number of female business leaders and entrepreneurs, as well as contribute to the economic development and competitiveness of the Canadian and US economies. Summary  Full Report
  2. Increasing the number of women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) (Mar 2018):  The U.S. and Canadian economies need more entrepreneurs and more leaders to create businesses based on exciting advances in technology. An education in science, technology, engineering or math, collectively known as STEM, is one of the most effective tools for launching new businesses.  Summary  Full Report
  3. Attracting women entrepreneurs, encouraging women to start businesses (Mar 2018): Businesses owned and operated by women are the lifeblood of our cities, towns and villages. Vibrant as these enterprises are, the large majority remain small with limited prospects for growth. Vast opportunity remains for women to start and lead more high-growth businesses with national and global ambitions. Summary  Full Report
  4. Increasing women’s access to capital (May 2018): Over the past decade, women have started successful businesses at a significantly faster rate than in the past, and currently own 40% of private businesses (with or without employees). Studies also show that new businesses with at least one female founder outperformed their all-male counterparts over the past 10 years.  Summary   Full Report

Minority Business Development Agency

  • The Minority Business Development Agency: Vital to Making America Great (2017/2018):  By 2044, the Nation’s prosperity will rely even more on minorities, the fastest growing segment of the population. Entrepreneurship is a sure pathway to wealth creation and a thriving national economy. Today, U.S. minority business enterprises represent 29% of all firms but only 11% have paid employees. If MBEs were to obtain entrepreneurial parity, the U.S. economy would realize 13 million more jobs. Summary  Full Report

The Information’s VC Diversity Index

  • VC Diversity Index (2018):  This is our updated index of diversity in the venture capital industry. It’s the third time since 2015 we have published this list in order to put some hard numbers around the lack of diversity in venture capital. For three months, we worked with Social Capital to gather data on 624 senior investment professionals at the 73 biggest firms. Unlike other studies of VC diversity, we rank individual firms from best to worst. Those rankings are based on scores of gender, ethnic and age diversity. We provide scores for each of those categories while the overall score is an average of those three. In each case, the maximum score is 10 and the minimum score is zero. Must enter email to view

TechCrunch Include

  • The 2017 TechCrunch Include Progress Report (April 2018):  This is the second annual TechCrunch Include Progress Report. Covering diversity and inclusion in the tech industry cannot be done in a vacuum. As aspects of identity are intersectional, so too should be the way in which media approaches its coverage of the tech industry. With each passing year, companies big and small release diversity data, highlighting the need for more inclusive hiring  Full Report

Facebook Economic Impact Study

National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) Council

  • Understanding the Landscape: Access to Capital for Women Entrepreneurs (Mar 2018):  In conjunction with Women’s History Month, the National Women’s Business Council has released a report under their Access to Capital pillar titled Understanding the Landscape: Access to Capital for Women Entrepreneurs. The first of four reports released from the Council’s inter-agency agreement with the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress, synthesizes peer-reviewed literature published between 2010 and 2017 to develop a holistic understanding of the literature conducted on women’s entrepreneurship and capital. It also identifies future areas of investigation and gaps in literature for interested researchers.  Full Report

SCORE Association

  • The Megaphone of Main Street: Women’s Entrepreneurship, Spring 2018 (April 2018):  In conjunction with Women’s History Month, the National Women’s Business Council has released a report under their Access to Capital pillar titled Understanding the Landscape: Access to Capital for Women Entrepreneurs. The first of four reports released from the Council’s inter-agency agreement with the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress, synthesizes peer-reviewed literature published between 2010 and 2017 to develop a holistic understanding of the literature conducted on women’s entrepreneurship and capital. It also identifies future areas of investigation and gaps in literature for interested researchers.  Summary